Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo

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Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo

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Tokyo, Japan

AS DESCRIBED BY PROPERTY: The visionary design and award-winning service of Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo has helped the hotel to become recognized as the epitome of sophisticated luxury in the city. Located in the prestigious financial district within the historical and cultural center of Tokyo, the hotel embodies the best of both traditional and contemporary architecture. The 178 luxuriously appointed guestrooms and suites, nine restaurants and bars (including a Michelin-starred restaurant and an authentic Sushi restaurant) an award-winning spa all situated on the top floors of the hotel offer spectacular city views, which overlook the Imperial Palace garden and Mt. Fuji to the west and the city’s new landmark the Tokyo Skytree®, the world’s tallest broadcasting tower, to the east. 15 stately banquet and meeting rooms in the tower’s atrium and the adjacent national cultural heritage property. The Grand Ballroom, which can accommodate up to 400 guests, features the most advanced 360-degree projection technology, enabling guests to completely personalize the entire space with photography or film.

UNIQUE SUITE ACCESS™ EXPERIENCE/AMENITY: Welcome drink (Champagne or wine) or Welcome Fruits and Turn Down Sweets. Complimentary access to Heat & Water Facility including vitality pool, amethyst crystal steam room, sky view sauna and rain showers.

DESTINATION TIP: Nihonbashi’s prosperity started in 1590, when the first Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu moved the nation’s Shogunate Government to “Edo”, currently known as “Tokyo”. Shogun Ieyasu built the Nihonbashi Bridge in 1603, which the district is named after, and declared it to be the point of reference for Japan’s main roads. As a result, Nihonbashi developed into the traffic center in all of Japan and flourished as the busiest commercial center in the country.

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